One Pose, Many Components

A few months ago I read a post online from Dewey Nielson, someone at the forefront of the new generation of movement specialists in North America. Nielson’s article addressed the common misconception that in order to become more proficient at a specific movement, like a squat, we just need to practice squatting more. Continue Reading…

But…why?

Spend about 10 minutes with a 5-year-old and you’ll find yourself running out of answers to the question every kid loves to ask: “Why?”

We’re born with innate curiosity and the desire to learn. During infancy, the world is an endless canvas of sensory stimulation, most of which we’re just trying to absorb. Once we reach childhood, we try to make sense of what we see, hear, do, touch, taste and smell. In adolescence, our autonomy grows and we want more control over our surroundings, looking for ways to push the boundaries despite what we’ve already been told about why things are the way they are. Early adulthood brings with it the desire to enact change, to create our own “why” with regard to choices in education, career, and so on. And then later in life, when we possess long-established beliefs and boundaries, a child will come along and ask, “But…why?” and we’ll watch the next generation establish their own truths, perspectives and outlook on the world. Continue Reading…

Clarity of Movement, Clarity of Mind

When I logged onto Facebook this morning, one of the first posts to catch my eye came from my friend and colleague Simone: “The important thing is not what you practice, it is that you practice.” I’m sure this statement carries different meanings, depending on who reads it. What resonated for me is the sense of freedom suggested in not putting any boundaries around what “counts” as practice, reminding us that any practice is better than no practice. Continue Reading…

Transitions: More Than Just Jumping Through

Often when I fly, I end up sitting next to someone who has brought absolutely nothing along to occupy their time for the duration of the flight. This happens on quick trips to Montreal and New York, where I get the impression that the individual is just commuting, waiting for the moment of touchdown when they can spring into action and get going with whatever they need to do. But the more fascinating encounters are with those who sit and stare at the seat in front of them during the hours upon hours before arriving in more distant locales like Europe, India or even Australia. On both my trips to India, for example, I can remember watching in awe as at least one of my seat-mates passed the time with merely their own thoughts for distraction. Continue Reading…

Peace in a Purple Valley

I can’t quite believe it, but my first week at Purple Valley is already nearly over, and I only have one more week left in India before returning home (at least that’s what my plane ticket says…part of me wants to tear it up!).

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Asana: Seat, To Sit

The course I’m taking here is called “Conversations in Yoga”, led by Emil Wendel, who was recommended to me by my teacher, Ron Reid. The theme behind the course is stillness, and emphasizes the world beyond asana…meditation, pranayama, and of course, conversations.

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