Yoga for Beginners

I was first exposed to yoga about 12 years ago when I walked past a studio window at the Halifax YMCA where the woman (who would later become my first teacher) was leading an Ashtanga Primary Series class. As I watched the synchronized movements and became mesmerized with the way one pose flowed into the next, I thought to myself, “Wow…that looks like it feels really good.” Continue Reading…

An Update from Yoga Detour HQ

You can teach a student a lesson for a day, but if you can teach him to learn by creating curiosity, they will continue the learning process as long as they live. – Clay P Bedford

In just over two months, the first class of Yoga Detour teacher trainees will walk through the doors of the beautiful Mindful Movement Centre to embark on a 10-month program that will change the way they look at the yoga practice. Continue Reading…

One Pose, Many Components

A few months ago I read a post online from Dewey Nielson, someone at the forefront of the new generation of movement specialists in North America. Nielson’s article addressed the common misconception that in order to become more proficient at a specific movement, like a squat, we just need to practice squatting more. Continue Reading…

Here & Now

In yoga classes, there’s often mention of “being in the moment”. You know the cues, the ones that tell you to ground into your feet and really feel the earth; to pay attention to your breath and stay present; to turn your awareness inward. If I were to add together all the classes I’ve ever taken, with all of the classes I’ve ever taught, and then counted the times I heard someone (including myself) talk about being present and in the moment, I would have nowhere near enough fingers and toes to keep track. Continue Reading…

But…why?

Spend about 10 minutes with a 5-year-old and you’ll find yourself running out of answers to the question every kid loves to ask: “Why?”

We’re born with innate curiosity and the desire to learn. During infancy, the world is an endless canvas of sensory stimulation, most of which we’re just trying to absorb. Once we reach childhood, we try to make sense of what we see, hear, do, touch, taste and smell. In adolescence, our autonomy grows and we want more control over our surroundings, looking for ways to push the boundaries despite what we’ve already been told about why things are the way they are. Early adulthood brings with it the desire to enact change, to create our own “why” with regard to choices in education, career, and so on. And then later in life, when we possess long-established beliefs and boundaries, a child will come along and ask, “But…why?” and we’ll watch the next generation establish their own truths, perspectives and outlook on the world. Continue Reading…

Favourite Places to Get Moving

I’ve had a few students and friends tell me in the last couple of months that they really enjoyed April’s post on “Favourite Things”. It always surprises me that people not only read what I write, but take the advice to heart! So I thought I’d follow that post up with a few of my favourite places to practice movement in Toronto. Continue Reading…